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Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. mojavensis

Echinocereus triglochidiatus Engelm. var. mojavensis (Engelm. & J.M. Bigelow) L.D. Benson

Echinocereus mojavensis (Engelm. & J.M. Bigelow) Rümpler

Echinocereus mojavensis (Engelm. & Bigelow) Rümpler

Echinocereus triglochidiatus Engelm. var. mojavensis (Engelm. & Bigelow) L.D. Benson

Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog

KingdomPlantaePlants, but not fungi, lichens, or algae
SubkingdomTracheobiontaVascular plants—plants with a “circulatory system” for delivering water and nutrients
DivisionMagnoliophytaFlowering plants, also known as angiosperms
ClassMagnoliopsidaDicotyledons—plants with two initial seed leaves
SubclassCaryophyllidaeCacti, many other succulents, carnivorous plants, and leadworts
OrderCaryophyllalesIncludes cacti, carnations, amaranths, ice plants, and many carnivorous plants
FamilyCactaceaeSucculent (water-storing) plants, often spiny
GenusEchinocereusRibbed, small to medium-sized cacti
SpeciestriglochidiatusWith three barbed bristles (tri- for “three,” and glochidium, meaning “arrow points”)
var.mojavensisOf or relating to the Mojave desert

About plant names...

Mohave mound cactus is so named because it often forms large mounds, sometimes with as many as 500 heads. Cacti in this group are so highly variable in form that botanists have a really tough time sorting them out. They appear in a wide variety of desert habitats, over an altitude range of 492-11483' (150-3500 m).

Plants: Stems in mounds are densely packed, usually erect, roughly cylindrical or dome-shaped, and up to 12" (30 cm) in height. Each stem may be up to 12" (30 cm) high and ⅞-6" (2.5-15 cm) in diameter. They are typically covered with interwoven spines.

Spines: Each areole has 3 to 11 spines, which spread sideways. Spines may be straight or curved, though some plants have few spines. Areoles are white, and ⅜-1½" (1-4 cm) apart.

Flowers: Flowers are very attractive, funnel-shaped, 3-3½" (8-9 cm) in diameter, with tepals ranging from bright scarlet to orange-red. A nectar chamber surrounded by pink threadlike stamens attracts hummingbirds, which pollinate the cacti. Flowers appear from April to June.

Fruits: Green to yellow-green or pink, rarely red, and juicy at maturity.

Edibility: Fruits are edible at maturity.

Echinocereus species reportedly have the most flavorful fruits of all cacti in the Southwest. America Indians of the Southwest traditionally removed the spines by burning, then ate the fruits raw and rendered the stems into a pulp used to make baked goods and candy. (From Castetter, Edward F. 1935. Ethnobiological studies in the American Southwest. I. Uncultivated native plants used as sources of food. Biological Series No. 4: Volume 1. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico.)

Online References:

Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. mojavensis on Wildflowers, Ferns & Trees of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah

Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. mojavensis on www.llifle.com

Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. mojavensis on cactus-art.biz

Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. mojavensis on the USDA Forest Service's Fire Effects Information Database

Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. mojavensis on eFloras

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

4/30/2018 · Kelbaker Road, Mojave National Preserve, CA
≈ 10 × 7" (24 × 16 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

4/30/2018 · Kelbaker Road, Mojave National Preserve, CA
≈ 12 × 8" (31 × 20 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 7 × 4" (16 × 11 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

4/30/2018 · Kelbaker Road, Mojave National Preserve, CA
≈ 7 × 4" (16 × 11 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. mojavensis description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 1 Jul 2019.

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Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 8 × 5" (20 × 13 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 10 × 7" (24 × 16 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 8 × 5" (20 × 13 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 7 × 4½" (18 × 12 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

5/4/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 8 × 5" (20 × 13 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 7 × 4½" (18 × 12 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

5/4/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 6 × 5" (14 × 13 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

4/30/2018 · Kelbaker Road, Mojave National Preserve, CA
≈ 6 × 4" (15 × 10 cm)

Echinocereus triglochidiatus (Mojave Mound Cactus, Mojave Kingcup Cactus, Mojave Hedgehog)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 7 × 4" (16 × 11 cm)

Range:

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